2050

Together the LCICG members focus on both near-term and long-term technology perspectives.

This includes driving forward commercial opportunities to progress near-term carbon reduction and renewable energy goals to 2020, while simultaneously focusing on ambitious developments to put the UK energy system on a path to 2050 targets and deliver longer-term economic benefits to the UK.

Frequently asked questions

To view answers to each question, please click on the question:

What are the aims of the LCICG?

The LCICG aims to maximise the impact of UK public sector funding for low carbon technology, in order to:

  • Deliver affordable, secure, low carbon energy for the UK
  • Deliver UK economic growth
  • Develop the UK's capabilities, knowledge and skills

Who makes the decisions for the LCICG?

A representative from each LCICG member organisation attends LCICG Meetings and decisions are made by consensus. Chairing of the meetings rotates between the members. Government ministers have oversight of the work of the group.

Which organisations make up the LCICG?

The LCICG membership consists of core and associate members who use significant public funds to support innovation of low carbon technology. For more information about the LCICG membership, see About the LCICG.

Who do the LCICG members work with?

Together the LCICG members work with the widest possible range of innovators, both in the UK and globally, to maximise impact. These include academic groups, entrepreneurs, engineers, manufacturers, energy suppliers, installers, investors and end users.

Can I get funding from the LCICG?

No, the LCICG itself is not a funding body. However, many of the LCICG members support low carbon innovation through funding. For more information about the types of support available see the individual member profile pages. The Low Carbon Funding Landscape Navigator (www.lowcarbonfunding.org.uk) also lists funding opportunities.

What low carbon innovation do LCICG members support?

LCICG members support low carbon innovation across the full development lifecycle from initial research through to commercial deployment. For more information about the types of support available see the individual member profile pages.

What timescales are the LCICG members working to?

Together the LCICG members focus on both near-term and long-term technology perspectives. This includes driving forward commercial opportunities to progress near-term carbon reduction and renewable energy goals to 2020, while simultaneously focusing on ambitious developments to put the UK energy system on a path to 2050 targets and deliver longer-term economic benefits to the UK.

How does the LCICG decide which TINAs are developed?

There are many low carbon technologies that could make a valuable contribution to the UKs energy objectives. The LCICG chose to develop TINAs for technologies that previous analysis suggested were of particular importance to government objectives, where insufficient clarity existed, and/or where multiple LCICG members had an interest.

What are the origins of the LCICG?

The Low Carbon Innovation Group (LCIG) was first launched in 2008 as an initiative between the Technology Strategy Board, the Carbon Trust and the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). Membership of the group was expanded in 2009 to include the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), alongside the Research Councils UK (RCUK) who were represented by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Following a review of the low carbon innovation delivery landscape in 2011, the LCIG was re-launched as the Low Carbon Innovation Coordination Group (LCICG).

What is the importance of low carbon innovation?

The UK has ambitious targets to cut carbon emissions while sustaining security of supply and improving energy affordability. The 2008 Climate Change Act led to adoption of a legally binding 80% reduction target by 2050 and new carbon budgets are being introduced for each five year period, with ceilings set by the independent Committee on Climate Change (CCC).

Delivering this low carbon economy will require a radical transformation of the UKs energy infrastructure, underpinned by a portfolio of low carbon technologies capable of being deployed cost effectively and at scale. This will require significant investment in innovation and rapid deployment.

The private sector will play the major role in development and diffusion of new low carbon technologies. However, there are particular barriers which mean that the market may not deliver low carbon solutions sufficiently quickly to meet UK carbon reduction targets.

In particular, the lack of certainty in future carbon pricing and regulation often acts as a barrier to the significant scale of investment required to bring new energy technologies to market. The time to market for such technologies is also exceptionally long and there are significant displacement costs in competing with incumbent technologies.

Targeted public sector support, in partnership with the private sector, is vital to ensure progress at the pace required to meet our carbon reduction, security of supply and affordability objectives.

What are the challenges in low carbon innovation?

Developing low carbon technologies is a complex, multi-faceted challenge. Taking a new technology from initial concept to market-ready product involves an iterative, non-linear process typically including laboratory research, prototyping, sub-scale demonstration, full scale demonstration, manufacturing scale-up and market rollout.

But successful innovation needs much more than just technology development; it also requires the development of viable commercial businesses, creation of new markets and appropriate changes to the surrounding regulatory framework.

In addition to technical progress, successful innovation therefore requires business models to support commercialisation, removal of market barriers, building new skills and capacity and links into government policy formulation.

In order to deliver the technologies for a low carbon future, the UK needs wide ranging support for these different aspects of energy innovation. To be effective, this support needs to:

  • Span the full innovation journey to ensure integrated support from R&D to full market deployment;
  • Build on existing skills and networks to capture ideas from across the diverse spectrum of the UK science and research base; and
  • Leverage industrial capabilities to access large scale private sector expertise and resources.

The LCICG brings together organisations that span this full innovation journey to maximise the impact of public spending in low carbon innovation.